fantasyshewontknow.com

Quick review: Though a chick stupid and sexy at the same time is a great combination, you don’t want to deal with the consequence. Thing is, she may resist your advances or give ...

This data was last updated from 28-08-2013 07:05:04  (update).

Overview Info



  • Domain Name
    fantasyshewontknow.com
  • Favicon
  • Alexa Rank
    #0
  • Google Page Rank
    2
  • Ip Address
    83.149.126.5
  • Page Size
    6.1 KB
  • Images
    1 GIF, 3 JPG, 0 PNG
  • Heading
    H1 H2 H3 H4 H5 H6
    0 0 0 0 0 0

Website Meta Analysis



  • Title
    She Wont Know - rape porn, rape videos, rape photos, rape stories, rape sex, rape pictures, rape movies.
  • Meta Keyword
  • Meta Description
    Quick review: Though a chick stupid and sexy at the same time is a great combination, you don’t want to deal with the consequence. Thing is, she may resist your advances or give you some trouble as you try to do her. Why handle it all when ...

Technical Analysis



  • Webserver
    nginx/1.2.4
  • Ip Address
    83.149.126.5
  • Domain Age
    5 Years, 1 Months, 23 days.
  • Javascript Library
  • Language used
    HTML, CSS, Javascript

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) header show data header response from fantasyshewontknow.com.

HTML Analysis

  • server: nginx/1.2.4
  • date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 19:05:01 GMT
  • content-type: text/html
  • connection: keep-alive
  • x-powered-by: PHP/5.2.17
  • x-google-cache-control: remote-fetch
  • via: HTTP/1.1 GWA
No data whois for fantasyshewontknow.com

DNS Analysis


DNS servers
ns2.familynightmare.com [88.214.193.198]
ns1.familynightmare.com [83.149.126.5]


DNS Records

Answer records
fantasyshewontknow.com MX
preference: 10
exchange: relay.fantasyshewontknow.com
360s
fantasyshewontknow.com NS  ns1.familynightmare.com 360s
fantasyshewontknow.com NS  ns2.familynightmare.com 360s
fantasyshewontknow.com SOA
server: ns1.familynightmare.com
email: [email protected]
serial: 1351934970
refresh: 16384
retry: 2048
expire: 1048576
minimum ttl: 2560
360s
fantasyshewontknow.com A 83.149.126.5 360s

Authority records

Additional records
relay.fantasyshewontknow.com A 83.149.126.5 360s
ns1.familynightmare.com A 83.149.126.5 7200s
ns2.familynightmare.com A 88.214.193.198 7200s

Traffic Analysis

Magestic Backlinks
Daily Ranks
Rank Trend
Visitor Trend
Bounce Trend

HTML Analysis

HTML validation
  • 24 Errors
  • 12 Warnings
Ratio Text/Html
  • 0.35349355403469684
Message Error
  • Error Line 1, Column 1: no document type declaration; implying "<!DOCTYPE HTML SYSTEM>"
    <HTML>

    The checked page did not contain a document type ("DOCTYPE") declaration. The Validator has tried to validate with a fallback DTD, but this is quite likely to be incorrect and will generate a large number of incorrect error messages. It is highly recommended that you insert the proper DOCTYPE declaration in your document -- instructions for doing this are given above -- and it is necessary to have this declaration before the page can be declared to be valid.

  • Error Line 5, Column 7: required attribute "TYPE" not specified
    <style>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 72, Column 36: there is no attribute "LEFTMARGIN"
    <BODY BGCOLOR="#101010" leftmargin="0" topmargin="0" rightmargin="0" bottommarg…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 72, Column 50: there is no attribute "TOPMARGIN"
    …OR="#101010" leftmargin="0" topmargin="0" rightmargin="0" bottommargin="0" mar…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 72, Column 66: there is no attribute "RIGHTMARGIN"
    …tmargin="0" topmargin="0" rightmargin="0" bottommargin="0" marginwidth="0" mar…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 72, Column 83: there is no attribute "BOTTOMMARGIN"
    …rgin="0" rightmargin="0" bottommargin="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" TEX…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 72, Column 99: there is no attribute "MARGINWIDTH"
    …rgin="0" bottommargin="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" TEXT="#FFFFFF" LINK…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 72, Column 116: there is no attribute "MARGINHEIGHT"
    …rgin="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" TEXT="#FFFFFF" LINK="#FFFFFF" VLINK=…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Warning Line 81, Column 76: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …        <td><img src="p/she_wont_know_name.jpg" width="580" height="45" /></td>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 81, Column 76: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …        <td><img src="p/she_wont_know_name.jpg" width="580" height="45" /></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 84, Column 27: there is no attribute "BACKGROUND"
               <td background="p/bg_screen.jpg" align="center" valign="top"><a href…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  • Error Line 84, Column 177: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …_wont_know_s1.jpg" width="550" height="300" border="1" class="imgbrd"></a></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 87, Column 71: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
               <td><img src="p/screen_bottom.jpg" width="580" height="15" /></td>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 87, Column 71: required attribute "ALT" not specified
               <td><img src="p/screen_bottom.jpg" width="580" height="15" /></td>

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Error Line 98, Column 101: non SGML character number 146
    …e time is a great combination, you don’t want to deal with the consequence. Th…

    You have used an illegal character in your text. HTML uses the standard UNICODE Consortium character repertoire, and it leaves undefined (among others) 65 character codes (0 to 31 inclusive and 127 to 159 inclusive) that are sometimes used for typographical quote marks and similar in proprietary character sets. The validator has found one of these undefined characters in your document. The character may appear on your browser as a curly quote, or a trademark symbol, or some other fancy glyph; on a different computer, however, it will likely appear as a completely different character, or nothing at all.

    Your best bet is to replace the character with the nearest equivalent ASCII character, or to use an appropriate character entity. For more information on Character Encoding on the web, see Alan Flavell's excellent HTML Character Set Issues reference.

    This error can also be triggered by formatting characters embedded in documents by some word processors. If you use a word processor to edit your HTML documents, be sure to use the "Save as ASCII" or similar command to save the document without formatting information.

  • Error Line 98, Column 391: non SGML character number 146
    …things you could do to a girl when she’s not in control of anything, even her …

    You have used an illegal character in your text. HTML uses the standard UNICODE Consortium character repertoire, and it leaves undefined (among others) 65 character codes (0 to 31 inclusive and 127 to 159 inclusive) that are sometimes used for typographical quote marks and similar in proprietary character sets. The validator has found one of these undefined characters in your document. The character may appear on your browser as a curly quote, or a trademark symbol, or some other fancy glyph; on a different computer, however, it will likely appear as a completely different character, or nothing at all.

    Your best bet is to replace the character with the nearest equivalent ASCII character, or to use an appropriate character entity. For more information on Character Encoding on the web, see Alan Flavell's excellent HTML Character Set Issues reference.

    This error can also be triggered by formatting characters embedded in documents by some word processors. If you use a word processor to edit your HTML documents, be sure to use the "Save as ASCII" or similar command to save the document without formatting information.

  • Error Line 98, Column 1066: non SGML character number 146
    …now just how sluttish they all are. It’s like having no-holds-barred sex with …

    You have used an illegal character in your text. HTML uses the standard UNICODE Consortium character repertoire, and it leaves undefined (among others) 65 character codes (0 to 31 inclusive and 127 to 159 inclusive) that are sometimes used for typographical quote marks and similar in proprietary character sets. The validator has found one of these undefined characters in your document. The character may appear on your browser as a curly quote, or a trademark symbol, or some other fancy glyph; on a different computer, however, it will likely appear as a completely different character, or nothing at all.

    Your best bet is to replace the character with the nearest equivalent ASCII character, or to use an appropriate character entity. For more information on Character Encoding on the web, see Alan Flavell's excellent HTML Character Set Issues reference.

    This error can also be triggered by formatting characters embedded in documents by some word processors. If you use a word processor to edit your HTML documents, be sure to use the "Save as ASCII" or similar command to save the document without formatting information.

  • Warning Line 114, Column 15: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
     <a href=http://rapevideosclub.com/she_wont_know.html><b>READ REVIEW</b></a><br>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 114, Column 76: end tag for element "A" which is not open
     <a href=http://rapevideosclub.com/she_wont_know.html><b>READ REVIEW</b></a><br>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 116, Column 5: end tag for "FONT" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </TD>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 112, Column 1: start tag was here
    <font color=ffffff face=arial size=3>
  • Warning Line 124, Column 22: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
            <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-legacy.html>LEGAL POLICY</a> | <a hr…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 124, Column 71: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …l.com/udsl-legacy.html>LEGAL POLICY</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-p…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 124, Column 88: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    ….html>LEGAL POLICY</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-privacy.html>PRIVA…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 124, Column 140: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …om/udsl-privacy.html>PRIVACY POLICY</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-t…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 124, Column 157: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …tml>PRIVACY POLICY</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-terms.html>TERMS O…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 124, Column 209: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …om/udsl-terms.html>TERMS OF SERVICE</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-2…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 124, Column 226: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …l>TERMS OF SERVICE</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-2257.html>2257 NOT…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 124, Column 282: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …dsl-2257.html>2257 NOTICE(USA ONLY)</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-r…

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Warning Line 124, Column 299: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …7 NOTICE(USA ONLY)</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-refund.html>REFUND…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Error Line 124, Column 349: end tag for element "A" which is not open
    …SA ONLY)</a> | <a href=http://cs.cf-mail.com/udsl-refund.html>REFUND POLICY</a>

    The Validator found an end tag for the above element, but that element is not currently open. This is often caused by a leftover end tag from an element that was removed during editing, or by an implicitly closed element (if you have an error related to an element being used where it is not allowed, this is almost certainly the case). In the latter case this error will disappear as soon as you fix the original problem.

    If this error occurred in a script section of your document, you should probably read this FAQ entry.

  • Error Line 137, Column 5: end tag for "FONT" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    </td></tr>
    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  • Info Line 122, Column 1: start tag was here
    <font color=ffffff face=verdana size=1>
  • Error Line 141, Column 143: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …f" width="314" height="176" border="0"></a><br /><a href="http://proscribedsit…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  • Warning Line 141, Column 152: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …"314" height="176" border="0"></a><br /><a href="http://proscribedsites.com/ra…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  • Warning Line 141, Column 294: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ont color=ffffff size=2 face=arial>ProscribedSites.com Network</font></a><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

Visitor Analysis

Daily Visitor
  • 48 visits

In Page Analysis